top of page
Chandler_Logo_REV  JPEG.jpg

PRESS

  • Facebook
  • Instagram
  • x
  • LinkedIn
  • Youtube

San Francisco patches over homelessness, drug-abuse for APEC

Trevor Chandler, a public school teacher who is running for local office, said many residents in his district noticed homeless encampments getting pushed away from near the APEC conference and into their neighborhood.

“I’ve knocked on 2,000 doors and what voters are telling me is they are sick of Band-Aids going on these problems and pushing them elsewhere. That is why people are both simultaneously excited and upset to see how clean downtown is right now,” he said.

San_Francisco_Chronicle_(2019-10-31).svg.png

Moderates are trying to take over this powerful S.F. political group

Trevor Chandler — who is running for a seat in “D-trip” as well as the District 9 supervisorial seat representing the Mission, Portola and Bernal Heights — said the race for influence in the local party in March will have a direct effect on how the November 2024 election will shake out. He said the party has been taken over by “ideologues” who have caused “toxic fights” among local Democrats.

“I want to get back to building up Democrats and not tearing each other down,” Chandler said. “We elect people in name only and then all they do is sit around and not build up the party. It shows what a parody the San Francisco Democratic Party has become of itself.”

San_Francisco_Chronicle_(2019-10-31).svg.png

One year from the 2024 election, here are 10 storylines to watch

The most a donor can give a San Francisco candidate’s personal campaign is $500, meaning those who want to give more must contribute to an independent committee. In the first six months of this year, only a few big-name executives donated directly to candidates. Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman gave $500 to Breed’s reelection campaign. Tan donated the same sum to Trevor Chandler, who’s running from the right to replace termed-out Mission District Supervisor Hillary Ronen.

1050x0.jpg

DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images

logo-inline.png

Jackie Fielder, Trevor Chandler Lead Pack in Race to Represent San Francisco’s Mission District

More than a year before the election, the race to represent San Francisco’s Mission District is already heating up. 

Frontrunners are touting early fundraising successes, and the race—which includes several candidates so far—is already getting spicy, with a campaign finance investigation in the mix. 

A49A7725.jpg

Trevor Chandler, left, a candidate for District 9 supervisor in San Francisco, visited a park with his husband, Adrian Chang, and their dogs, Juliet and Milos.

Trevor Chandler Campaign

bay-area-reporter-logo.png

Political Notebook: Gay leader launches bid for SF District 9 supervisor

Relatively unknown outside of LGBTQ political circles, and a white candidate running for a seat San Francisco Latino leaders want to reclaim, Trevor Chandler is launching his bid for District 9 supervisor 19 months before voters will cast ballots in the race. By doing so, the gay leader aims to spend this year addressing the various hurdles he will face as a candidate.

"For me, the clear challenge I am dealing with is lack of name recognition. It is why I wanted to get started early," Chandler, 36, told the Bay Area Reporter in an exclusive interview about his candidacy. "I am not naïve. I know what my main challenge will be so I want to start heading out there and knocking on doors."

San_Francisco_Chronicle_(2019-10-31).svg.png

Supervisor race to represent the Mission and nearby neighborhoods kicks off in S.F.

The campaign for the San Francisco Board of Supervisors seat representing the Mission District is already heating up, more than 18 months before the election that could be pivotal to shaping the political balance of the city’s powerful legislative body. 

Trevor Chandler, a little-known Mission resident with a background in political organizing and the technology industry, kicked off the race Tuesday when he publicly declared that he was seeking the District Nine job held by progressive Supervisor Hillary Ronen, who cannot run for re-election due to term restrictions.

2300x0.jpg

Illegal vending is just one of the challenges facing the Mission and nearby neighborhoods as the race for District Nine supervisors kicks off.

Adam Pardee/Special to The Chronicle

Chandler_Logo_REV  JPEG.jpg
  • Facebook
  • Instagram
  • x
  • LinkedIn
  • Youtube

Paid for by Trevor Chandler for Supervisor 2024.
FPPC ID #1459563. Financial disclosures are available at
sfethics.org.

bottom of page